Here Are 10 Different Ways to Look at Elon Musk’s Record-High Net Worth

Elon Musk is the richest man in the world. But what does that really mean? Here are 10 ways to look at Elon Musk’s wealth.

Two hands holding champagne glasses toasting each other with Paris in the background

Image source: Getty Images.

Elon Musk is the wealthiest human on the planet — and the wealthiest in history. Just last week, he became the first person to hit US$300 billion after Tesla shares soared. And though his net worth has fluctuated since then, one thing’s clear — with Tesla and SpaceX, this guy could very well get wealthier.

Let’s assume, for the sake of argument, that Musk is worth US$275 billion (as of writing, his number is fluctuating between US$275 and $281 billion). What could Elon Musk buy if he cashed in his assets?

Let’s look at what US$275 billion could buy.

1. Musk could buy Finland

Finland has been ranked the happiest country in the world for four years in a row. With its abundance of saunas, reindeer, and rye bread, as well as being the home of Santa Claus, Finland could be a lucrative investment for Musk. Finland has a gross domestic product of US$252 billion, meaning Musk could buy Finland, then have money to build a glass igloo in the north to look for the Aurora Borealis.

2. Costa Rica, Iceland, Jamaica, Ecuador, and Luxembourg?

Why buy one country when you can buy five? With US$275 billion Musk could buy Costa Rica ($57.29 billion), Iceland ($24.49 billion), Jamaica ($14.78 billion), Ecuador ($104 billion), and Luxembourg ($62.32 billion).

3. Any one of 153 nations

Actually, Musk has a lot of options. With a net worth of $275 billion, Musk could pick any one of 153 nations, combining them as he pleases. That includes Portugal ($219 billion), Perú ($211 billion), New Zealand ($204 billion), and Greece ($203 billion). And if his net worth reaches $277, he could buy Chile ($277 billion).

4. To the moon and back 10 times

According to NASA, it would cost around US$28 billion to go to the moon and back. At that price, Musk could take 10 trips.

5. Own it?

If we believe the controversial businessman and self-designated “owner of the moon,” Dennis Hope, then we could value the moon at US$180 billion. At that price, Musk could buy the moon, as well as take a few trips there and back.

6. General Motors, Ford, BMW, and Hyundai

If Musk ever got off the whole electric car thing, he could be the owner of four lucrative fossil fuel giants: General Motors ($89.75 billion), Ford ($78.12 billion), BMW ($69.15 billion), and Hyundai ($40.51 billion).

7. He could buy Bill Gates and Warren Buffett

Who says money can’t buy friends? With $275 billion, Musk could buy Bill Gates ($131 billion) and Warren Buffett ($103.1 billion), and he would even have money left over to buy Tom Brady ($270 million) and Wayne Gretzky ($200 million).

8. He could buy every team in hockey

The average NHL franchise, according to Sportico, is around $934 million. If Musk were to buy every team in hockey (34), he would still have plenty of money left to buy a nation or two (or a friend to enjoy the games with).

9. Solve world hunger

According to David Beasley, the director of the World Food Program, Elon Musk could solve world hunger with US$6 billion. Surprisingly, Musk came back and said he might be willing to donate that much if Beasley could prove he can solve world hunger right now.

10. 1.375 million Tesla Roadsters

Yep. With $275 billion, Musk could buy 1.375 million Tesla Roadsters, which will reportedly cost $200,000 when they’re released in 2023. With that many Teslas in his garage, he would have enough to give the country of Estonia a Tesla (1.326 million people), and keep some for himself.

This article represents the opinion of the writer, who may disagree with the “official” recommendation position of a Motley Fool premium service or advisor. We’re Motley! Questioning an investing thesis — even one of our own — helps us all think critically about investing and make decisions that help us become smarter, happier, and richer, so we sometimes publish articles that may not be in line with recommendations, rankings or other content.

More on Personal Finance