3 No-Brainer Stocks to Buy Now for Less Than $1,000

If you’re looking for companies bound for more greatness, these three no-brainer stocks are easy buys, no matter what the market does in the future.

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Canadian investors might be a bit on edge these days. Geopolitical tensions and economic uncertainty have made it a bit rough when it comes to investing. But there are still strong deals to be had — especially when it comes to investing in companies that do well pretty much no matter what.

Today, we’re going to look at three no-brainer stocks you can buy no matter the economic climate. Now, let’s get into them.

Topicus

First up is Topicus (TSXV:TOI), and while this is a newer company, there is certainly a big reason to consider this stock. The technology company is known for providing innovative software solutions primarily in the public sector, healthcare, education, and financial services industries. 

Topicus has grown into a prominent player in the European tech scene. The company’s mission is to create digital solutions that empower organizations to streamline their operations, enhance efficiency, and improve service delivery.

Yet the big part here? The company grows through acquisitions and is backed as a spinoff of Constellation Software. Yet, while Constellation stock costs about $3,600 as of writing, Topicus stock costs just $118. That makes it a strong investment you can look forward to earning from for decades to come.

Hydro One

Another company to consider on the TSX today is Hydro One (TSX:H). Hydro One stock has been a big winner within the last decade. The utility company has seen its shares rise higher and higher as an essential service. However, there is more immediate growth than what you might see from other utility companies that have been on the market for some time.

While it might be new on the market, the company originally came on the scene back in 1906! Now playing a crucial role in supplying electricity to homes, businesses, industries, and more across Ontario. In fact, historically, Hydro One was owned entirely by the government of Ontario. 

However, in 2015, the government initiated the process of partially privatizing the company through an initial public offering (IPO). As a result, a portion of Hydro One’s shares were sold to private investors while the government retained a significant ownership stake. Now you can pick it up with shares up 12% since the market bottom in October and a 3.14% dividend yield.

FirstService

Another strong stock to consider is FirstService (TSX:FSV). The North American company that provides essential property services, primarily in the real estate and property management sectors. FirstService operates through two main business segments: Residential and Brands.

The residential segment provides residential property management services, including condominium and homeowner association management, rental property management, and other related services. FirstService Residential is one of the largest residential property management companies in North America, serving over 8,000 communities across the United States and Canada.

Meanwhile, the Brands segment includes various property services businesses that offer essential services to both residential and commercial properties. These services include property restoration, commercial cleaning, painting, and handyman services, among others. And with shares up 4% in the last year, it’s another no-brainer you can hold for years to come.

This article represents the opinion of the writer, who may disagree with the “official” recommendation position of a Motley Fool premium service or advisor. We’re Motley! Questioning an investing thesis — even one of our own — helps us all think critically about investing and make decisions that help us become smarter, happier, and richer, so we sometimes publish articles that may not be in line with recommendations, rankings or other content.

Fool contributor Amy Legate-Wolfe has positions in Topicus.com. The Motley Fool has positions in and recommends Topicus.com. The Motley Fool recommends FirstService. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.

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